Physiological monitoring following stroke

Introduction

On completion of this module you should have a critical understanding of the relevance and importance of monitoring in acute stroke patients, understanding the relevance and the implications of investigation and management of individual patients. Further resources can on this topic can be found below.

The answers to all the test questions are contained within the module. This information may be provided in the 'Additional Information' boxes on some of the pages.

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Introduction and Overview

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Patient Scenario 1 - Jean (Blood Pressure and Heart rate)

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Patient Scenario 2 - Bob (Blood Glucose)

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Patient Scenario 3 - Archie (Temperature, Respiratory Rate and Oxygen Level)

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Patient Scenario 4 - Maisie (Glasgow Coma Scale)

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Conclusion

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Module Test

Useful Resources

  • Rowat, A, Morrow, B, Steele, B. Using the mnemonic ‘brain attack’ in the management of stroke. Nursing Standard 2009 24(6):50-57.
  • Best Practice (BEST PRACT), Vital Signs. 1999; 3(3): 1-6
  • Jones S.P., Leathley M.J., McAdam J.J., Watkins C.I. (2007) Physiological Monitoring in acute stroke: a literature review. Journal of Advanced Nursing 60(6), 577-594
  • Jevon, P. (2008) Neurological Assessment Part 4 - Glasgow Coma Scale 2. Nursing Times; 104:30:24-25
  • Patient Assessment Part 4 – Blood Glucose Testing. Nursing Times 2008 Mar 11; 104 (10) 25
  • SIGN Guideline 108: Management of patients with stroke or TIA: assessment, investigation, immediate management and secondary prevention Section 8 [.pdf, 4.39MB]
  • Warlow C, van Gijn J, Dennis M, et al. (2008) Stroke practical management. 3rd ed. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing
  • Whelan K (2001) Inadequate fluid intakes in dysphagic acute stroke. Clinical Nutrition. 20:423-8.
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